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Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex

By

John Campbell

, DVM, DVSc, Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan

Last full review/revision Mar 2015 | Content last modified Mar 2015

Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) has a multifactorial etiology and develops as a result of complex interactions between environmental factors, host factors, and pathogens. Environmental factors (eg, weaning, transport, commingling, crowding, inclement weather, dust, and inadequate ventilation) serve as stressors that adversely affect the immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms of the host. In addition, certain environmental factors (eg, crowding and inadequate ventilation) can enhance the transmission of infectious agents among animals. Many infectious agents have been associated with BRD. An initial pathogen (eg, a virus) may alter the animal’s defense mechanisms, allowing colonization of the lower respiratory tract by bacteria.

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Respiratory Diseases of Small Animals
An obese, 13-year-old, neutered male Pomeranian is brought to the veterinarian because of a cough that has worsened over the last 3 to 4 months. His owner reports that the cough sounds like a “goose honk,” occurs when the dog is excited (e.g., when the doorbell rings), and is unproductive of sputum. The dog then appears to have trouble breathing after coughing. On physical examination, auscultation of the heart and lungs is normal, and the veterinarian is unable to stimulate the cough. The owner declines thoracic x-rays due to financial concerns. Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis?
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